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Disbarments
  1. LARRY PAUL JAMES
  2. ERIC JON PROSSER
  3. COLBERN COX STUART III
  4. STEPHEN RANDALL HARRIS
  5. ROY EARNEST PETERSON
  6. FREDERICK JOHN STOCKER
  7. GREGORY MICHAEL CZARKOWSKI
  8. WILLIAM MAURICE FELDMAN
  9. KENNETH LEE KIDDY 

LARRY PAUL JAMES [#183769], 46, of Sacramento was disbarred Dec. 6, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

James was charged in 2011 with failing to comply with rule 9.20 under an earlier disciplinary order. When he did not appear for trial, his default was entered; when he did not try to have the default set aside, he was disbarred under rule 5.85 of the State Bar’s Rules of Procedure. James had six other disciplinary matters pending before the bar court and he has two prior discipline records.

In the underlying matter, James was placed on probation for three years and suspended for two years and until he made restitution to two clients and proved his rehabilitation. The misconduct, in two matters, included failures to perform legal services competently, return $15,000 in unearned fees or communicate with his client and he engaged in acts of moral turpitude.

Earlier, he was placed on two years of probation and given a 90-day stayed suspension for misconduct in four client matters, including failures to perform services competently, return $11,100 in unearned fees, cooperate in a bar investigation and communicate with his client.

As part of the disbarment, the bar court concluded James did not comply with rule 9.20 because he failed to submit an affidavit stating he notified his clients, opposing counsel and other interested parties of his suspension.

ERIC JON PROSSER [#185726], 43, of Vista was disbarred Dec. 6, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Prosser was charged in 2011 with six counts of misconduct but did not respond to the charges and his default was entered. Under rule 5.85 of the State Bar’s Rules of Procedure, the bar petitioned for Prosser’s disbarment because he did not try to have the default set aside within 180 days. The charges were deemed admitted.

The bar court found that he failed to perform legal services competently by not filing a proof of service or appearing in court for an order to show cause hearing; he failed to obey a court order, pay court-ordered sanctions or report the sanctions to the bar; he failed to protect his clients’ interests in an appeal after receiving notice of its default; he did not give his client’s file to a new lawyer; and he did not keep his membership records current with the bar.

Prosser also was disciplined in 2011 for failing to communicate or inform his clients of significant developments, cooperate with the bar’s investigation or update his official membership records address and he improperly withdrew from employment. His default was entered in that matter as well when he did not respond to the charges.

COLBERN COX STUART III [#177897], 44, of Marina del Rey was disbarred Dec. 6, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Stuart was convicted criminally of creating and sending approximately 21 emails and/or telephone calls to his former wife that were threatening, obscene and calculated to harass. The conviction went to the State Bar Court for a determination of whether it involved moral turpitude.

Stuart did not respond to a notice of hearing on conviction (HOC) and his default was entered. When he made no move to have the default set aside within 180 days, the bar petitioned for his disbarment under rule 5.85 of its Rules of Procedure. The bar court also found that the conviction did involve moral turpitude.

Stuart had no prior discipline record.

STEPHEN RANDALL HARRIS [#64176], 64, of Reno, Nev., was disbarred Dec. 19, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

The Nevada Supreme Court disciplined Harris in 2012 after he misappropriated approximately $788,000 by making numerous unauthorized withdrawals from his client trust accounts and his law firm’s general client trust account. He used the money for personal gain. Harris reported his misconduct to the Nevada State Bar, repaid all the money to his client trust account and denied himself access to his firm’s accounts.

He stipulated that his misconduct in Nevada warranted discipline in California.

In mitigation, he had no prior discipline record, expressed remorse and took steps to repay the money, and he was alcohol dependent and suffered resulting emotional problems. He completed treatment for alcoholism and other mental disorders.

ROY EARNEST PETERSON [#153455], 68, of El Monte was disbarred Dec. 19, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Peterson failed to comply with a 2011 disciplinary order by not filing with the State Bar Court an affidavit stating that he notified his clients, opposing counsel and other interested parties of his suspension. Failure to comply with rule 9.20 is grounds for disbarment. He also did not comply with other probation conditions, committed acts of moral turpitude and failed to avoid harm to his client’s interests.

Peterson stipulated that he also violated the terms of a 2010 disciplinary probation by filing six quarterly probation reports late and not filing two others, and by failing to provide proof of attendance at ethics school.

Peterson also was disciplined in 2000 and 2004 for misconduct that included failures to perform legal services competently, account for client funds, release a client file and communicate with clients.

FREDERICK JOHN STOCKER [#106382], 56, of San Diego was disbarred Dec. 19, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Stocker was convicted of misdemeanor child pornography after his law firm discovered he had downloaded a large number of pornographic images to his work computer. He was fired and charged with 55 counts of possessing child pornography. Stocker pleaded guilty to one count of downloading images to his computer; he did not purchase, post or exchange any images or have contact with children in person, online or in chat rooms. He was placed on probation and registered as a sex offender. After finding Stocker complied with his probation conditions, the court reduced his probation from formal to summary and the conviction was expunged in 2011.

In mitigation, Stocker took steps that recognized his wrongdoing, including completing a program for  sexually compulsive behavior and enrolling in the Lawyer Assistance Program, he submitted evidence of his good character, provided pro bono services, cooperated with the bar’s investigation and had no prior discipline record.

GREGORY MICHAEL CZARKOWSKI [#213070], 39, of Santa Clara was disbarred Dec. 19, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Czarkowski did not participate in disciplinary proceedings after he was charged with six counts of misconduct so his default was entered. When he did not move within 180 days to have the default vacated, the State Bar petitioned for his disbarment under rule 5.85 of its Rules of Procedure. The charges were deemed admitted.

Czarkowski failed to perform legal services competently by not appearing in two traffic cases, he improperly withdrew from employment, failed to communicate with his client or return $1,451 in unearned fees, he did not cooperate with the bar’s investigation and he committed acts of moral turpitude by making misrepresentations to his client.

WILLIAM MAURICE FELDMAN [#89222], 65, of Los Angeles was disbarred Dec. 19, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Feldman did not participate in disciplinary proceedings after he was charged with five counts of misconduct so his default was entered. When he did not move within 180 days to have the default vacated, the State Bar petitioned for his disbarment under rule 5.85 of its Rules of Procedure. The charges were deemed admitted.

Feldman failed to perform legal services competently by not supervising his employee in handling his clients’ personal injury matter and by failing to file a complaint on their behalf before the statute of limitations expired. He failed to maintain client funds in trust by not depositing in his trust account a check for $1,230 he received for the clients. Feldman did not respond to his clients’ status inquiries or cooperate with the bar’s investigation, and he committed acts of moral turpitude by mishandling a settlement check — he deposited it in his employee’s bank account instead of his trust account.

Feldman was ordered to make restitution totaling $1,230.38 plus 10 percent interest to the clients.

KENNETH LEE KIDDY [#85060], 63, of Stockton was disbarred Dec. 19, 2012, and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Kiddy did not participate in disciplinary proceedings after he was charged with two counts of misconduct so his default was entered. When he did not move within 180 days to have the default vacated, the State Bar petitioned for his disbarment under rule 5.85 of its Rules of Procedure. The charges were deemed admitted.

He improperly withdrew from a case and he did not cooperate with the bar’s investigation.

Kiddy has been disciplined three times previously, beginning with probation and a stayed suspension in 2010 after he stipulated to failures to perform competently, return unearned fees or inform his client about the status of the case. The following year, he stipulated that he failed to perform competently, return unearned fees or keep clients informed about the status of their cases, and he improperly withdrew from employment, disobeyed a court order and knowingly made a false statement.

His probation was revoked later in 2011 for failing to comply with probation requirements.

. Caution!  More than 200,000 attorneys are eligible to practice law in California. Many attorneys share the same names. All discipline reports are taken from State Bar Court documents and should be read carefully for names, ages, addresses and bar numbers. Read the Discipline Key for an explanation of the different levels of disciplinary action. Use Attorney Search to check an attorney's official bar membership record.