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Suspensions/Probation
  1. RONNY MOR
  2. JONATHAN EDWARD ROBERTS
  3. ALI EBRAHIMZADEH
  4. LEE ALAN GROSS
  5. RANDALL CURTIS STERLING
  6. JAMES PATRICK STONEMAN II
  7. GEOFFREY ALAN SUTLIFF
  8. WILLIAM RALPH WALZ
  9. EMILE ADLAI DAVIS
  10. ARIANNE KENNEDY HEATH
  11. DANE PAUL MILLER
  12. CHRISTOPHER JOHN VAN SON
  13. ANA MARIA VELLANOWETH
  14. TIMOTHY BROOKS BALCOM
  15. AMY LYNN BINGHAM
  16. DAMON ERIC GARDNER
  17. JAMES HSIAOSHENG LI
  18. THEODORE EDWARD MALPASS
  19. CATALINA LOREDO MANZANO
  20. STEVEN KENNETH PERRIN
  21. CHARLTON KIPP WORDELL
  22. ALBERT MYRICK GRAHAM JR.
  23. ANTHONY EMMANUEL PAGKAS
  24. CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL SALAYSAY
  25. NAVINDER VIRK
  26. RAYNARD SHELBY PACE
  27. ALLEN CLARENCE HASSAN
  28. FRANKLIN WRIGHT NELSON
  29. DERON ADAM KARTOON

RONNY MOR [#248274], 38, of San Diego, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE and make restitution. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 7, 2016.

Mor provided loan modification services in Minnesota, where he is not licensed to practice law, collected an illegal fee and failed to promptly return client papers and property.

He was ordered to pay $4,250 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, he had no prior discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

JONATHAN EDWARD ROBERTS [#166043], 54, of Norwalk, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 7, 2016.

In 2011, Roberts was hired to file a criminal appeal and received $20,000 over six months to do so. Roberts did not substitute in as counsel until nine days before the deadline for filing the appellate opening brief. Although he was given 60 more days, he did not file the opening brief and the client’s matter was dismissed. Roberts ultimately returned the $20,000.

In mitigation, he was experiencing family and physical problems, presented evidence of his good character and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

Roberts had a 2004 suspension for failing to perform, refund unearned fees, respond to client inquiries, participate in State Bar investigations or return a client file.

ALI EBRAHIMZADEH [#249989], 42, of Oakland, was suspended from the practice of law for six months and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 15, 2016.

Ebrahimzadeh charged and collected an unconscionable fee of $33,500 to represent a client in his criminal matters. The client was unsophisticated and mentally impaired at the time he signed the fee agreements, the amount of the fee was disproportionate to the services charged and the client did not provide informed written consent when he signed the agreement. After fee arbitration, Ebrahimzadeh paid $32,770.78 to the client, who ended up hiring a new attorney after Ebrahimzadeh withdrew from representation.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline, entered into a prefiling stipulation, offered evidence of his good character and has done community service.

LEE ALAN GROSS [#153412], 58, of Irvine, was suspended from the practice of law for 18 months and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court, make restitution and take the MPRE. He was also placed on three years’ probation and faces a three-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 15, 2016.

Gross was found culpable of misconduct in 20 matters stemming from his ownership and operation of State Trust Legal Inc., a business providing loan modification services that advertised legal services online and nationwide. Gross collected illegal fees and held himself as entitled to practice law in states where he wasn’t admitted: South Carolina, Michigan, Texas, New York, Georgia, Florida, Illinois and Massachusetts.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.  

RANDALL CURTIS STERLING [#138674], 57, of San Diego, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on one year of probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 15, 2016.

Sterling’s suspension follows his successful completion of the Alternative Discipline Program. The underlying discipline sprang from Sterling falsely reporting to the State Bar he had met his MCLE requirements when he had not.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline and cooperated with the State Bar.

JAMES PATRICK STONEMAN II [#94523], 63, of Claremont, was suspended from the practice of law for 60 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 15, 2016.

In one matter for which he was disciplined, Stoneman failed to comply with the terms of his private reproval by not submitting a final report to the Office of Probation on time and failing to complete Ethics School or take the MPRE. In another matter, he failed to provide a client with an accounting for $5,000 in advanced fees.

In mitigation, Stoneman presented evidence of his good character, was having family problems at the time of his misconduct and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

Stoneman’s public reproval was for improperly withdrawing from employment and failing to perform legal services competently, promptly refund unearned fees, promptly respond to reasonable status inquiries or cooperate with a State Bar investigation.

GEOFFREY ALAN SUTLIFF [#224566], 62, of Sacramento, was suspended from the practice of law for six months and ordered to take the MPRE, make restitution and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 15, 2016.

In one matter for which he was disciplined, Sutliff took more than a year to finalize a marital settlement agreement on a client’s behalf and then never filed it. He did not complete any more work on the divorce matter and failed to refund $3,000 in unearned fees, provide an accounting or respond to letters from a State Bar investigator.

He was ordered to pay $14,000 plus interest in restitution.

WILLIAM RALPH WALZ [#136995], 55, of Foothill Ranch, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 15, 2016.

Walz failed to abide by the terms of a private reproval by representing a client while he was not eligible to practice law, failing to submit two out of four quarterly reports to probation on time and not providing proof of having passed the MPRE within a year of the effective date of his discipline. His private reproval was for practicing law while on inactive status due to not meeting his MCLE requirements.

In mitigation, Walz was suffering extreme emotional difficulties at the time of his most recent misconduct, entered into a pretrial stipulation and presented evidence of his good character.

EMILE ADLAI DAVIS [#208394], 50, of San Francisco, was placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. He was also ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Jan. 15, 2016.

Davis did not comply with the terms of a private reproval by not meeting with his probation deputy and failing to submit four quarterly reports and a final report or complete and pass the MPRE and Ethics School. The private reproval was for failing to pay sanctions.

In mitigation, he was experiencing family problems at the time of his most recent misconduct and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

ARIANNE KENNEDY HEATH [#283325], 36, of Ione, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days. She was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if she does not comply with the terms of her disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 28, 2016.

In 2014, Heath pleaded guilty to driving under the influence with a blood alcohol level of .08 or greater with an enhancement for having a person under the age of 14 in the vehicle. The charges stemmed from a 2013 accident in which Heath rear-ended a vehicle that was turning left into a private driveway. Her children, ages 2 and 3, were with her at the time.

DANE PAUL MILLER [#226332], 54, of Los Angeles, was suspended from the practice of law for 90 days and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 28, 2016.

Miller failed to deposit in his client trust account $18,412.02 he received as the settlement in a medical malpractice case. Soon after, Miller’s firm dissolved. Miller later mailed a check and accounting of the settlement funds to the client’s former home address, so the client did not receive it. After the client filed a complaint with the State Bar, Miller sent him a new cashier’s check and accounting.

In addition to not promptly providing his client with access to the settlement money, Miller failed to provide the client with an accounting for $16,000 in costs he’d paid and used funds deposited in his trust account to pay for cashier’s checks issued to Miller’s landlord.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.  

CHRISTOPHER JOHN VAN SON [#133440], 54, of Oak View, was suspended from the practice of law for 18 months and until he makes restitution. He was also placed on three years’ probation and faces a three-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 28, 2016.

Van Son was suspended after his participation in the Alternative Discipline Program was terminated for failing to comply with the conditions of his program plan.

The underlying discipline involves nine client matters. Van Son was found culpable of misconduct that included collecting advanced fees for loan modification services and causing employees to solicit business from prospective clients Van Son did not have a family or prior professional relationship with. He also violated rule 9.20 and failed to promptly return unearned fees, provide clients with a consumer notice stating that it is not necessary to pay a third party to negotiate a loan modification or cooperate with a State Bar investigation.

He also engaged in an act of moral turpitude by mailing out solicitation letters in South Carolina that contained misrepresentations.

He was ordered to pay restitution with interest in six client matters for unearned fees totaling $15,994.

He had one prior record of discipline, a 2012 suspension for seven counts of misconduct including engaging in the unauthorized practice of law in another jurisdiction, failing to perform with competence, abandoning a client, collecting illegal fees and accepting advanced fees to perform mortgage loan modification work.

ANA MARIA VELLANOWETH [#108633], 49, of Los Angeles, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. She was also placed on one year of probation and faces a one-year suspension if she does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Jan. 28, 2016.

Vellanoweth reported under penalty of perjury she had met her MCLE requirements when she had not. She took the necessary hours to come into compliance after she was contacted by the State Bar regarding an MCLE audit.

In mitigation, she had no prior record of discipline, entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar, has done community service and presented evidence of her good character.

TIMOTHY BROOKS BALCOM [#190496], 52, of Roseville, was suspended from the practice of law for two years and until he provides proof of his rehabilitation. He was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. In addition, he was placed on three years’ probation and faces a three-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 2, 2016.

Balcom’s suspension follows his termination from the Alternative Discipline Program because of his failure to comply with its requirements. Balcom had previously stipulated that he failed to comply with the conditions attached to a private reproval, failed to comply with the conditions attached to his disciplinary probation and engaged in the unauthorized practice of law.

He had two prior records of discipline. In 2012, he was privately reproved for a DUI conviction. In 2013, he was suspended for violating the terms of that private reproval.

AMY LYNN BINGHAM [#250122], 40, of Costa Mesa, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. She was also placed on one year of probation and faces a one-year suspension if she does not comply with the terms of her disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 6, 2016.

Bingham’s discipline stems from a public reprimand she received in Utah for the unauthorized practice of law. In 2009, Bingham moved to Utah with her husband. Soon after, she met a recently admitted attorney and the two agreed to go into a partnership with Bingham serving as a law clerk until she was admitted to practice law there. Despite that agreement, Bingham entered into an attorney-client agreement with a Utah consumer, signed a doctor’s lien as “attorney of record,” and advised a consumer on a divorce matter.

In mitigation, she entered into a prefiling stipulation with the State Bar, has done community service, presented evidence demonstrating her good character and cooperated in disciplinary proceedings.

DAMON ERIC GARDNER [# 226776], 41, of Redwood Valley, was suspended from the practice of law for 90 days and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 6, 2016.

In February 2014, Gardner pleaded guilty to carrying a concealed weapon, a misdemeanor. In 2013, while a deputy district attorney in Mendocino County, Gardner and a female companion attended a prosecutor’s conference in Sacramento. At the time, Gardner had a concealed weapon permit, although it was not valid if he was under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

After drinking heavily, Gardner got into an argument with his companion because she did not want to go to a bar and preferred to go back to their hotel. After she left, he got into a fight with two men. They brought him to the ground and proceeded to kick and punch him, and he shot one of them in the abdomen.

Gardner fled the scene and was arrested later that evening after flagging down a patrol car and turning himself in.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline, entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar, presented evidence of his good character and acknowledged his wrongdoing.

JAMES HSIAOSHENG LI [#176662], 50, of Buena Park, was suspended from the practice of law for six months and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 6, 2016.

A State Bar Court hearing judge found Li culpable of six counts of misconduct in two client matters. Li appealed, saying he had acted in good faith. A three-judge review panel found him culpable of five of the six charges with an additional aggravating factor and upheld the judge’s discipline recommendation.

In one matter, Li charged a client he was representing in a civil suit $12,000, a nonrefundable retainer, plus an additional $30,000 in advanced fees he claimed were refundable “when the guarantee by the attorney is not met.” Li also agreed to handle any appeals free of charge. After an unfavorable ruling, Li reneged on his promise to handle the case for free, saying he’d have to charge the client because she did not cooperate with him in court and that her testimony was “utterly stupid.”

Li did not deposit the $30,000 advance fee in his client trust account until after the client won a case against him for fraud and breach of contract. On March 5, 2011, the day the trial for fraud and breach of contract was to begin, Li filed a personal bankruptcy petition, causing a stay of the trial. In doing so, Li made a false representation to the bankruptcy court, saying he had undergone credit counseling prior to filing when he had not.

Li also collected an illegal fee by entering into five promissory notes with a client charging unfair interest rates.

Li received some mitigating credit for a lack of prior discipline and community service.

THEODORE EDWARD MALPASS [#112914], 63, of Laguna Beach, was suspended from the practice of law for 90 days and ordered to take the MPRE, make restitution and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on three years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 6, 2016.

Malpass charged and collected a total of $42,000 to handle a couple’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy case without obtaining the bankruptcy court’s approval for employment. He was ordered to pay $42,000 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

CATALINA LOREDO MANZANO [#191928], 47, of Reseda, was suspended from the practice of law for six months and ordered to take the MPRE, comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court and make restitution. She was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if she does not comply with the terms of her disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 6, 2016.

Manzano failed to comply with six court orders in a civil matter she handled, which included repeatedly failing to show up for court hearings and failing to pay court sanctions. She also failed to respond to an email and letter from a State Bar investigator.

In another matter, she was paid $2,500 to file a wrongful termination claim but never filed the complaint or performed any related services. She failed to return any part of the unearned fees and did not cooperate with a State Bar disciplinary investigation.

Manzano also failed to file a wrongful termination complaint on behalf of a client or take any other action to pursue his claims by the statute of limitations, did not respond to six phone calls from the client inquiring about the status of his matter and did not return $1,500 in unearned fees. Because of her inaction, the client filed a claim in pro per but it was barred because the deadline had passed.

In addition, Manzano wrote two checks from her client trust account to pay personal expenses. The account had insufficient funds to cover them.

She was ordered to pay $4,000 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

STEVEN KENNETH PERRIN [#144539], 52, of Camarillo, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days, with credit given for his time of inactive enrollment, and was ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 6, 2016.

Perrin’s suspension follows his successful completion of the Alternative Discipline Program. He stipulated that he failed to properly disburse client funds, failed to provide a client with an accounting, failed to promptly respond to reasonable status inquiries and failed to cooperate in a disciplinary investigation.

Perrin had no prior record of discipline.

CHARLTON KIPP WORDELL [#191544], 45, of Roseville, was suspended from the practice of law for 180 days, with credit given for his time of inactive enrollment, and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on three years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 6, 2016.

Wordell’s suspension followed his successful completion of the Alternative Discipline Program. The underlying discipline stemmed from his multiple criminal convictions: a 2011 conviction for false imprisonment, a 2012 conviction for violating a protective order, a 2013 conviction for driving under the influence, a 2002 conviction for driving under the influence, a 2009 conviction for disturbing the peace and a 2008 conviction for reckless driving.

ALBERT MYRICK GRAHAM JR. [#44490], 78, of Santa Ana, was suspended from the practice of law for two years and until he provides proof of his rehabilitation. He was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. In addition, he was placed on three years’ probation and faces a three-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 12, 2016.

A hearing judge found Graham culpable of failing to comply with rule 9.20. Graham appealed, asserting the Office of Chief Trial Counsel had failed to prove the violation and that, in any event, it was a “technical and insignificant instance of noncompliance.” A three-judge review panel affirmed the hearing judge’s discipline recommendation.

In mitigation, Graham stipulated to certain facts in his case and took some steps to comply with rule 9.20, although he should have done so earlier.

Graham had two prior records of discipline: a 2012 suspension that stemmed from his underpayment of taxes for three years and a 2002 private reproval for improperly entering into a business transaction with a client.

ANTHONY EMMANUEL PAGKAS [#186112], 49, of San Jose, was suspended from the practice of law for 90 days and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 19, 2016.

Between 2005 and 2012, Pagkas worked for the owners of a San Jose nightclub on various legal matters. There was no retainer agreement, and he informally billed them without invoices. In the spring of 2011, the relationship started to deteriorate. The owners asked Pagkas for information regarding ongoing legal issues, but Pagkas did not provide a substantive response. They eventually started questioning Pagkas about the fees they’d already paid and asked him for billing information and files. Pagkas never provided a response of any substance, did not provide an accounting of the fees paid, did not provide billing information and delayed in providing them with their files.

In mitigation, he entered into a prefiling stipulation with the State Bar.

He had one prior discipline, a 2011 suspension for improper pecuniary interest adverse to a client and failure to perform competently or report sanctions in excess of $1,000.

CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL SALAYSAY [#264317], 41, of Union City, was suspended from the practice of law for two years, with credit given for time he was placed on inactive status. The suspension will last until he provides proof of his rehabilitation. He was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. In addition, he was placed on three years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 19, 2016.

In 2014, Salaysay pleaded guilty to one count of stalking with a prior conviction for stalking, a misdemeanor. In 2011, Salaysay began stalking a woman he had dated, initially calling her 50 times a day for weeks. He also sent the woman harassing and threatening texts and emails, calling her at one point and stating, "If you were here, I would kill you."

The threatening emails and text messages continued and Salaysay made threats against the victim in messages he sent to her friend. He also made threats on Facebook using an alias and posed as the woman on several online sex sites, giving out her phone number. As a result, the woman received text messages and calls from men trying to confirm arrangements to have sex with her.

On May 10, 2012, the woman received a call from a blocked number which was actually Salaysay who described how he would get into her apartment and “get” her. Later, he sent her an email using an alias with correspondence between him and the seller of a handgun. The woman ultimately received a temporary restraining order and Salaysay stopped contacting her.

Prior to his admission to practice law, he was convicted of stalking another woman.

In mitigation, Salaysay had no prior record of discipline since his admission to practice law and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

NAVINDER VIRK [#224585], 41, of San Francisco, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. She was also placed on one year of probation and faces a one-year suspension if she does not comply with the terms of her disciplinary investigation. The order took effect Feb. 19, 2016.

Virk stated under penalty of perjury to the State Bar that she had met her MCLE requirements when she had not. She was placed on involuntary inactive status, then took the necessary hours to come into compliance, paid the fees and was reinstated.

In mitigation, she had no prior record of discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation.

RAYNARD SHELBY PACE [#188901], 45, of West Hollywood, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on one year of probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. The order took effect Feb. 19, 2016.

Pace reported to the State Bar that he was in compliance with his MCLE requirements when he was not. He took the necessary courses after he was contacted in connection with an MCLE audit.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline.

ALLEN CLARENCE HASSAN [#104024], 80, of Sacramento, was placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. He was also ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Feb. 19, 2016.

A doctor and a lawyer, Hassan failed to obey a court order by not appearing at a hearing in a workers compensation case and not paying the $1,000 in sanctions that resulted for 16 months. A woman claimed that she had hired Hassan as her attorney, paying him $600 of a $1,000 fee. After he did not appear for her hearing, Hassan wrote a letter to the judge and said he had only been hired to write a medical-legal type report. The judge ordered him to appear, but he did not show up at a subsequent hearing. He did show up at the next hearing but was an hour late.

Hassan did not report the sanctions to the State Bar and did not respond to a letter from a State Bar investigator looking into the allegations against him.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline, presented evidence of his good character, has done community service and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

FRANKLIN WRIGHT NELSON [#146433], 57, of Pasadena, was placed on one year of probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. He was also ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Feb. 19, 2016.

Nelson stated to the State Bar that he was in compliance with his MCLE requirements when he was not. He later completed the required hours and paid the applicable penalties as part of an MCLE audit.

In mitigation, he had no prior record of discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

DERON ADAM KARTOON [#155925], 49, of Ross, was suspended from the practice of law for two years and until he provides proof of his rehabilitation. He was also ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect March 19, 2016.

Kartoon was suspended  after his probation was revoked for failing to comply with the terms of his disciplinary probation. Specifically, he did not supply the Office of Probation with a medical waiver, did not file his first quarterly report on time, did not provide probation with his selection of an abstinence based drug abuse recovery program , did not provide his selection of a licensed medical laboratory and failed to provide his first four test results on time.

In the underlying matter, respondent was suspended in June 2015 after he was found culpable of engaging in the unauthorized practice of law, committing an act of moral turpitude and failing to cooperate with the State Bar’s investigation.

. Caution!  More than 200,000 attorneys are eligible to practice law in California. Many attorneys share the same names. All discipline reports are taken from State Bar Court documents and should be read carefully for names, ages, addresses and bar numbers. Read the Discipline Key for an explanation of the different levels of disciplinary action. Use Attorney Search to check an attorney's official bar membership record.