California Bar Foundation
 
Suspensions/Probation
  1. PATRICK ESMAEL SAFFARIAN
  2. KENNETH MATTHEW COOKE
  3. SHEILA MARIE HATHAWAY
  4. NICHOLAS HRANT LAMBAJIAN
  5. LAUREN ELICIA WOMACK
  6. NATALIE DOR-DOR WANG
  7. MICHAEL WAYNE CHAMP
  8. JACK KENNETH CONWAY
  9. PHILLIP KENNETH EVANS
  10. MICHAEL LEE GOOLSBY
  11. DONALD ARTHUR HILLAND
  12. THOMAS LLEWELLYN REED
  13. MARGARET ALICE SELTZER
  14. ROBERT FRANK ZWIERLEIN
  15. JAMES DARRYL IVEY
  16. WILLIAM ROBERT TROIANI
  17. JOHN REFAAT HABASHY
  18. PAUL J. MAJORS
  19. ANTONIO MUNOZ
  20. CORNELL JOHN PRICE
  21. TARA SELVER
  22. RAUL THOMAS SOSA
  23. SEAN DONRAD
  24. ROBERT MARSHALL FRENCH
  25. DANA ALLAN GODFREY
  26. JIYOUNG KYM
  27. BRIDGET LYNN TRACY
  28. JESSANY EMILEIGH GARRETT 


PATRICK ESMAEL SAFFARIAN [#217520], 44, of San Jose
, was suspended for one year and until he pays restitution in accordance with the terms of an earlier disciplinary probation. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

Saffarian’s probation was revoked after he violated three conditions of the probation imposed on him in a 2011 disciplinary order. Saffarian failed to meet deadlines for submitting quarterly probation reports and did not provide proof of having made restitution payments and attendance at ethics school. 

In the underlying discipline, Saffarian stipulated to 22 counts of misconduct in five separate client matters. The misconduct included failing to competently perform legal services, failing to inform clients of significant developments, failing to promptly refund unearned fees, failing to cooperate in the State Bar's disciplinary investigation, failing to obey court orders and improperly withdrawing from employment.

KENNETH MATTHEW COOKE [#159341], 47, of San Diego, was suspended for two years, stayed, and placed on two years’ probation with an actual six-month suspension and until he makes restitution. Cooke was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Aug. 16, 2013.

Cooke initially stipulated to seven acts of misconduct stemming from his handling of bankruptcy matters. Those included failing to communicate with clients, return unearned fees, account or to perform legal services competently. The California Supreme Court, however, returned the matter to the State Bar for further consideration as to the level of discipline.

Noting that additional disciplinary charges had been filed against Cooke and consolidated with the stipulation, State Bar Court Judge Lucy Armendariz called his continuing misconduct “concerning.”

“That being said, respondent had yet to have the opportunity to complete any of his probation obligations, which are designed to rehabilitate the attorney and to protect the public from similar future misconduct,” she wrote.

In all, Cooke was found culpable of 12 acts of misconduct in six client matters. In most of the bankruptcy matters, Cooke charged clients advanced fees but failed to provide any legal services of value or provide legal services with competence. Cooke was ordered to pay $2,555.15 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, Cooke had no prior record of discipline, cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation and presented witnesses who testified as to his good character.

SHEILA MARIE HATHAWAY [#229806], 58, of Raleigh, N.C., was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years’ probation with an actual 90-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Aug. 16, 2013.

Hathaway pleaded no contest in 2011 to defrauding an innkeeper, a misdemeanor conviction involving moral turpitude.

Hathaway was arrested in 2010 for failing to pay a cab driver and a bill for meal at a restaurant in San Jose, as well as a bill for two days’ stay at a hotel in Los Gatos. The charges relating to the restaurant and cab bills were later dismissed.

In mitigation, Hathaway had no prior discipline, cooperated with the State Bar and was experiencing emotional difficulties at the time of her misconduct.

NICHOLAS HRANT LAMBAJIAN [#175420], 45, of Monrovia, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on one year of probation with an actual 30-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Aug. 16, 2013.

Lambajian stipulated to four counts of misconduct in one client matter: failing to perform legal services with competence, return unearned advanced fees, return unused filing fees or to respond promptly to reasonable status inquiries of a client. In 2009, a man hired Lambajian to handle his bankruptcy case, paying him $2,500 in advanced fees and $300 to cover filing costs. For nearly a year and a half, the client repeatedly called to check on the status of his case, but Lambajian never returned his calls. In October 2011, the client learned his bankruptcy petition had never been filed and fired Lambajian, asking for his money back. Lambajian did not return the unearned fees and unused filing fees until February 2013.

In mitigation, Lambajian had no prior discipline in 18 years of practicing law and cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulation prior to trial.

LAUREN ELICIA WOMACK [#259520], 32, of Long Beach, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on two years’ probation with an actual 90-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE, comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court and to pay restitution. The order took effect Aug. 16, 2013.

Womack stipulated to seven counts of misconduct in three client matters, including failing to perform legal services of value, collecting advanced fees for loan modification services, practicing law in a state where she was not authorized to do so and collecting an illegal fee.

In one of the matters she was disciplined for, Womack was paid $3,000 in advanced fees to negotiate and obtain a home loan modification on behalf of a client. Womack never advised the client that it wasn’t necessary to pay a third party to arrange for a loan modification and did not provide any services of value in connection with negotiating and obtaining a home loan modification. The man’s house was sold in a trustee’s sale.

In another matter, Womack accepted employment from a Massachusetts resident, even though she was not licensed to practice law there. Womack accepted $3,000 from the woman to negotiate and obtain a loan modification on her behalf, which constitutes collecting an illegal fee. Womack was ordered to pay $8,350 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, Womack entered into a stipulation with the State Bar prior to trial.

NATALIE DOR-DOR WANG [#231122], 34, of Glendale, was suspended for three years, stayed, placed on three years’ probation with a 12-month actual suspension and until she provides proof of her rehabilitation and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Aug. 23, 2013.

In 2012, Wang stipulated to misconduct in three client matters: two counts of moral turpitude, two counts of failure to act with competence, seeking to mislead a court, the unauthorized practice of law in another jurisdiction and three counts of failure to cooperate in a State Bar investigation. The Supreme Court ultimately returned the matter to the State Bar for further consideration as to the appropriate level of discipline.

In two of the matters she was disciplined for Wang lied to family law clients, telling them she had filed court documents in their cases when she hadn’t and in one case went as far as providing a client with falsified court documents. In both of the matters, Wang did not respond to State Bar investigators’ letters after disciplinary complaints were filed against her.

In another matter, Wang represented her father’s company in a patent action in U. S. District Court, even though she was not admitted to the bar of that court, and misrepresented to the court that she had been authorized to represent the company on behalf of the law firm where she worked.

In mitigation, Wang entered into an extensive stipulation admitting to her misconduct.

MICHAEL WAYNE CHAMP [#95784], 59, of Woodland Hills, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on three years’ probation with an actual one-year suspension and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

The State Bar Court found that Champ failed to perform legal services with competence or to communicate and improperly withdrew from a client’s personal injury case. Starting in 2009, Champ began representing a woman in a slip-and-fall personal injury matter. But for months he did not return her repeated phone calls inquiring about a release she was asked to sign to settle her case. Champ also did not appear at multiple court hearings in the case.

Champ has one prior record of discipline, a 2010 suspension for seven counts of misconduct in two client matters including failing to perform competently, keep his clients reasonably informed of significant developments, promptly pay out client funds, respond to reasonable status inquiries, take reasonable steps to avoid foreseeable prejudice upon termination of employment or to cooperate in State Bar investigations.

JACK KENNETH CONWAY [#45063], 83, of San Marino, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on three years' probation with an actual two-year suspension and ordered to take the MPRE, comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court, and pay restitution. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

Conway stipulated to misappropriating $9,555.13 he received on behalf of a client from a personal injury matter, money that he later repaid. Conway also violated the conditions of a 2011 private reproval by failing to meet two deadlines for submitting probation reports and failing to provide proof that he had taken and passed the MPRE. Conway received the private reproval in 2011 for failing to obey a court order and to perform.

PHILLIP KENNETH EVANS [#208336], 65, of Lake Elsinore, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on three years' probation with an actual six-month suspension, ordered to take the MPRE, comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court and pay restitution. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

Evans stipulated to misconduct in four client matters including accepting advanced fees for home loan modification services, improperly withdrawing from employment and failing to perform legal services with competence, return unearned fees or to respond to a client’s reasonable status inquiries.

In two of the matters, Evans took advanced fees from clients in home loan modification matters before he had completed the services he agreed to perform and did not repay any portion of the illegal fees he collected.

Evans’ other misconduct involved two bankruptcy cases. He collected advanced fees to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy petitions on behalf of both clients, but failed to perform any legal services of value. After Evans’ clients repeatedly called to get updates on their cases, they drove to Evans’ office, only to find it empty.

Evans was ordered to pay $3,849 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, Evans had no prior discipline and cooperated with the State Bar.

MICHAEL LEE GOOLSBY [#159660], 46, of Newport Coast, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 90-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

Goolsby stipulated that he failed to meet numerous conditions of his probation stemming from a 2011 disciplinary order. He failed to contact the Office of Probation within 30 days of the effective date of his suspension, submit five quarterly reports to probation, make restitution payments to his former clients and to attend and pass ethics school within one year of the effective date of discipline.

In the underlying discipline, Goolsby was suspended for misconduct related to loan modification activities.

DONALD ARTHUR HILLAND [#240436], 56, of San Fernando, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 60-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

Hilland stipulated to charging $2,600 in advanced fees for loan modification services prior to completing the agreed-upon work and violating California law by not advising the client in writing that he could obtain a loan modification without the help of a third party. He also stipulated to committing moral turpitude by altering the date of a fee agreement and attempting to mislead the State Bar concerning his loan modification services.

In mitigation, Hilland cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a stipulated settlement.

THOMAS LLEWELLYN REED [#122624], 63, of Forest Falls, was suspended for two years, stayed and placed on three years' probation and until he makes restitution. Reed was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

In 2011, Reed stipulated to misconduct stemming from nine loan modification matters he handled, but the California Supreme Court returned the matter to the State Bar for further consideration of the recommended discipline. The State Bar Court recommended the discipline be increased, including an actual suspension that will continue until Reed repays $47,730 in unearned fees collected from the nine clients.

In 2009, Reed entered into an agreement with a company called RJV to provide loan modification services to Reed’s clients. In exchange for general office support, Reed agreed to give RJV a portion of the legal fees he collected from his loan modification clients. At the same time, Reed entered into an agreement with another firm named Unison Marketing to advertise and collect fees on his behalf in exchange for a portion of the legal fees.

In addition to splitting fees with non-attorneys, Reed failed to perform legal services competently, failed to return unearned fees in nine client matters, render appropriate accounts in two of the nine matters, promptly respond to one client’s status inquiries or to keep another client informed of significant developments and misused his client trust account.

In mitigation, Reed had no prior discipline in 23 years of practicing law and showed remorse and recognition of his wrongdoing. In addition, his misconduct occurred within a relatively short amount of time and has not reoccurred.

MARGARET ALICE SELTZER [#87707], 67, of San Francisco, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual six-month suspension and until she makes restitution. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

Seltzer sought review of a State Bar Court hearing judge’s recommendation that she receive a one-year actual suspension for failing to perform competently and failing to return unearned fees. Seltzer challenged the judge’s culpability findings and requested that the case be dismissed, claiming the judge erred by not throwing out the case.

A three-judge panel upheld the judge’s suspension recommendation, but found the level of discipline recommended to be excessive given the facts of the case. The panel found that Seltzer failed to perform competently because she provided no service of value to her clients and failed to return unearned fees.

In 2009, a construction company paid Seltzer a $6,000 advanced fee to help resolve its dispute with a school district over work it did on a renovation project. For two months, the owners of the construction company called and emailed Seltzer, trying to get an update on their case, but Seltzer made excuses about why she was not available or did not respond at all. After the client fired her, Seltzer returned only $1,500 of the fees, despite providing them with no services of value. She was ordered to pay $4,500 plus interest in restitution.

Seltzer had one prior discipline, a 2012 suspension for six counts of misconduct in two client matters, including the unauthorized practice of law, charging and collecting an illegal fee and failing to cooperate with a State Bar investigation, keep a client informed of a significant development and to promptly return a client’s file.

ROBERT FRANK ZWIERLEIN [#138485], 50, of Hawthorne, was suspended for two years, stayed, and placed on two years' probation with an actual one-year suspension, with his period of inactive enrollment credited against his actual suspension. He was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Aug. 30, 2013.

A hearing judge recommended that Zwierlein’s probation be revoked after he violated the conditions of a 2011 disciplinary order. Zwierlein sought review, arguing that the judge’s recommendation of an actual one-year suspension was excessive. A three-judge review panel adopted the hearing judge’s findings and agreed with the recommended discipline.

Zwierlein violated his probation by failing to arrange a meeting with probation on time, meet deadlines for submitting four quarterly reports or to attend State Bar Ethics School before the ordered deadline.

In the underlying discipline, Zwierlein stipulated to misconduct in two client matters. He failed to report sanctions, pay sanctions in violation of a court order, keep a client involved of significant developments or act with competence.

JAMES DARRYL IVEY [#154832], 50, of Oakland, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on two years' probation and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Aug. 23, 2013.

Ivey stipulated that he failed to perform legal services with competence, respond to his client’s reasonable inquiries about the status of his case or cooperate with a State Bar investigation.

In 2011, a former client hired Ivey to prepare and prosecute a patent matter with the U. S. Patent and Trademark Office. After filing a patent application, Ivey did no additional work on his client’s behalf, causing the patent application to be declared abandoned. When the client sent an email asking for an update, Ivey did not respond.

In mitigation, Ivey cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a pre-trial stipulation and had no prior discipline in 21 years of practicing law.

WILLIAM ROBERT TROIANI [#236916], 50, of Santa Ana, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 60-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Sept. 1, 2013.

Troiani stipulated to misconduct in two client matters, including appearing without authority as an attorney for a party, failing to perform legal services with competence, disobeying a court order by failing to pay sanctions, and failing respond promptly to reasonable status inquiries of a client.

In one of the client matters, Troiani filed a civil suit in 2007 on behalf of a client and added the client’s son as a plaintiff in the matter despite never speaking to the son to ask his permission. Troiani also failed to appear at multiple hearings in the case, appear at a mediation and to file key court documents, including a motion to oppose the defendants’ three motions for sanctions, terminating sanctions and summary judgment. Troiani also did not pay any of the $34,035.55 in sanctions.

In the other matter, in 2009, Troiani and the Debt Relief Center charged a client $7,500 in upfront fees to file a civil lawsuit intended to help a client avoid foreclosure or obtain a loan modification. The client asked numerous times for an update on his matter, but did not learn until months later that no work had been performed on his behalf.

JOHN REFAAT HABASHY [#236708], 34, of Los Angeles, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 30-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Sept. 6, 2013.

Habashy was found culpable of four counts of misconduct stemming from three client matters: charging an upfront fee for a loan modification, seeking to convince a client to withdraw a disciplinary complaint and failing to return unearned fees or render appropriate accounts.

Habashy ran a company called Legal Debt Solutions, which was hired by a homeowner facing foreclosure to obtain a loan modification. Thinking he could lawfully charge upfront fees for loan modification work by unbundling his services, Habashy broke his services into three categories, charging $750 in advanced fees for each and the remainder of his fees after completion of the work. In one client matter, Habashy charged a client $1,500 upfront for work to be done in two of the categories. He did not charge the client the final payment because he did not complete the loan modification phase of the work.

In another matter he was disciplined for, Habashy failed to return $2,399 in unearned fees to a client for more than eight months after she fired him. In a third matter, he sent a client who complained to the State Bar about him a refund for fees along with a note for him to sign stating that the client was dropping his complaint. When Habashy learned the note could violate the California Business and Professions Code, he contacted the client and told him to tear up the note.

In mitigation, Habashy agreed to a partial stipulation of facts in his discipline case, which saved the State Bar resources, and presented several credible witnesses who attested to his good character.

PAUL J. MAJORS [#153641], 65, of San Juan Capistrano, was suspended for three years, stayed, and placed on three years' probation with an actual 14-month suspension and credit for time he spent on inactive enrollment. He was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Sept. 6, 2013.

Majors’ suspension followed his successful completion of the State Bar Court’s Alternative Discipline Program. The underlying discipline stemmed from Majors’ improper withdrawal from employment and failure to perform services competently, communicate with a client, obey court orders, comply with rule 9.20 or return unearned fees. While participating in the Alternative Discipline Program, Majors made restitution to two former clients.

ANTONIO MUNOZ [#169530], 57, of Colton, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual six-month suspension and ordered to take the MPRE, comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court and to pay restitution. The order took effect Sept. 6, 2013.

Munoz stipulated to commingling funds in his client trust account, writing checks from his client trust account when there were insufficient funds to cover them and failing to perform legal services with competence, return unearned fees, respond to a client’s reasonable status inquiries or cooperate and participate in a State Bar investigation. Munoz also misrepresented to a client that he had filed a complaint in her case and had served the defendants when he had not done so.

Between Oct. 1, 2011 and Aug. 31, 2012, Munoz maintained earned fees and paid his personal expenses from his client trust account. Overwhelmed after losing his secretary and being forced to manage his finances on his own, he also wrote a number of checks despite having insufficient funds to cover them.

In another matter in 2012, Munoz was hired by a client to incorporate two businesses and to assist with the collection of a debt. Despite the fact that the client paid $4,200 in advanced fees, Munoz never formed the two corporations, took no action to collect the debt and did not provide the client with any legal services of value.

Munoz was also hired in 2012 to help a client take legal action against two former tenants for unpaid rent and damages. Munoz never filed the complaint, but told the client he had and repeatedly ignored her requests for an update on her case. The woman paid Munoz $1,700 in advance fees, which he did not refund.

Munoz was ordered to pay $6,700 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, Munoz had no prior discipline in 18 years of practicing law, admitted to his wrongdoing, and the misconduct took place over a relatively short period of time – a year.

CORNELL JOHN PRICE [#62443], 70, of Pasadena, was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 30-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Sept. 6, 2013.

Price stipulated that he failed for more than a year to pay the $5,000 balance of the unearned fees owed to a woman who wanted him to represent her in her criminal case. The woman paid Price $15,000 in advanced fees, then tried to substitute Price in as her counsel of record but was unsuccessful. After she terminated Price’s employment, he refunded $10,000 of the fees. But Price did not return the rest of the money until February 2013 after a new arbitration award was rendered in favor of the client and the State Bar had launched an investigation into Price’s misconduct. Price also failed to respond to letters from a State Bar investigator.

In mitigation, Price had no prior discipline in more than 37 years of practicing law and cooperated with the State Bar by entering into a pre-trial stipulation.

TARA SELVER [#153373], 58, of Torrance, was suspended for two years, stayed and placed on two years' probation with an actual 60-day suspension and until she pays restitution. She was ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court should her actual suspension last 90 days or more. The order took effect Sept. 6, 2013.

Selver stipulated that she failed to submit a final written report to the Office of Probation and pay restitution as required by a 2010 private reproval. She was ordered to pay $7,500 plus interest in restitution.

RAUL THOMAS SOSA [#58353], 65, of Altamonte Springs, Fla., was suspended for two years, stayed, placed on three years' probation with an actual one-year suspension, ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Sept. 6, 2013.

Sosa stipulated to misconduct in two client matters. In one of the cases, he failed to tell a client about a settlement offer he received in her personal injury case and cashed the $3,000 check that accompanied it, thereby eliminating her chance of negotiating a higher amount. After learning of the settlement offer on her own months later, the client called Sosa repeatedly, but he did not return her voicemail messages. Six months later, Sosa sent her a check minus his fees.

In the other matter, Sosa waited more than two years to give a client her share of the settlement money in her personal injury case. During that period of time, Sosa misappropriated $600.82 of the client’s funds which he was supposed to be maintaining in his client trust account.

Sosa received limited mitigation for stipulating to the facts in his discipline case.

He has one prior record of discipline. In 1992, he was suspended for doing work for three clients at a time when he was ineligible to practice law because he had not paid his membership dues.

SEAN DONRAD [#242665], 45, of Piedmont, was suspended for two years, stayed, and placed on two years' probation with an actual suspension of one-year and until he makes restitution. He was also ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. The order took effect Sept. 13, 2013.

Donrad sought review of a hearing judge’s discipline recommendation for committing ethical violations involving three clients: performing incompetently, committing an act of moral turpitude by misrepresentation, misleading a judge, engaging in the unauthorized practice of law and failing to return unearned fees, render an accounting or inform a client of significant developments. A three-judge review panel adopted the hearings judge’s findings and discipline recommendation.

In one of the matters Donrad was disciplined for, which occurred in 2009, he charged a client $3,800 to help settle his divorce case, but didn’t perform any legal services on his behalf. The client fired him and asked him for an accounting of the $3,800 and a refund of any unearned fees, but Donrad never responded.

In another matter, Donrad was hired to represent a homeowner in a complaint filed against his homeowners’ association alleging that it had improperly collected dues. In January 2011, he was enrolled inactive and ineligible to practice law after his default was entered in a prior discipline case. Donrad did not tell the client about his status, then failed to show up for a critical hearing and failed to arrange for another attorney to appear in his place.

Donrad was ordered to pay $3,800 plus interest in restitution.

Donrad’s default stemmed from a 2011 discipline in which he was suspended for failures to perform with competence, release a client file or refund unearned fees in a single client matter.

ROBERT MARSHALL FRENCH [#98654], 57, of Sherman Oaks, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 30-day suspension and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Sept. 13, 2013.

French stipulated to failing to pay a $7,000 sanction in a divorce case or report that sanctions had been issued against him. French also failed to cooperate or participate in a disciplinary proceeding because he did not respond to two letters from a State Bar investigator.

French has one prior record of discipline. In 1997, he was publicly reproved for participating in a lawyer referral service that used false, misleading or deceptive advertisements.

DANA ALLAN GODFREY [#152913], 62, of Diamond Bar, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 30-day suspension, ordered to take the MPRE and pay restitution. The order took effect Sept. 13, 2013.

Godfrey stipulated that he failed to returned unearned fees to two clients he represented in family law matters, abide by the terms of his retainer agreements with them before and after he started work with a new firm, return unearned fees or cooperate with a State Bar investigation.

In one of the matters, Godfrey’s client was unable to reach him for six months about her divorce case because he didn’t tell her he had taken a new job. He failed to show up for a status conference in her case. Godfrey then substituted his new firm in as attorney of record in her case. Despite repeated requests, Godfrey failed to provide the client with an itemized billing statement reflecting the status of $5,000 in advanced fees the client paid him at the start of her case. Godfrey also failed to attend a mandatory settlement conference. He later provided the State Bar with an accounting indicating that he had not earned $2,375 of the fees the client advanced him.

In the other matter, Godfrey failed to respond to a client’s repeated requests for an itemized billing statement showing the status of $3,500 in advanced fees she had paid him. Godfrey ultimately provided the State Bar with an accounting indicating that $1,945 of the fees had not been earned.

Godfrey was ordered to pay $4,320 plus interest in restitution.

In mitigation, he had no other discipline in more than 21 years of practice.

JIYOUNG KYM [#125974], 62, of Los Angeles, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation with an actual 90-day suspension, ordered to take the MPRE, comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court and pay sanctions. The order took effect Sept. 13, 2013.

Kym stipulated to committing multiple acts of misconduct, including failing to perform in four client matters, communicate significant developments in six client matters, comply with the court’s order to show cause in one client matter, pay six sanctions in three client matters on time and report two sanctions to the State Bar. Kym also filed an unjust adversary complaint in a bankruptcy case.

In mitigation, Kym was candid with the State Bar during its investigation and stipulated to his misconduct at an early stage of proceedings. Kym also had no prior discipline in 22 years of practicing law. At the time of his misconduct, he was dealing with the stress of caring for his elderly, ailing mother who resides in Korea.

As a condition of his probation, Kym was ordered to pay the balance of $6,540 in sanctions due to opposing counsel in one of his cases and to submit proof of payment to the Office of Probation within six months of the effective date of the disciplinary order against him.

BRIDGET LYNN TRACY [#171772], 60, of Huntington Beach, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Sept. 6, 2013.

Tracy stipulated that on Sept. 20, 2011, she made a false report to the Huntington Beach Police Department, an act involving moral turpitude, dishonesty or corruption. According to the stipulation, Tracy called 911 to report that a woman was threatening to stab an acquaintance of hers at his home. When police responded, they discovered Tracy had made a false report and that she had ill feelings toward the woman she claimed was the assailant because she considered her a romantic rival. In the course of the police and State Bar investigations, Tracy admitted to being angry, using bad judgment and having had too much to drink at the time of the incident.

In mitigation, Tracy had no other discipline in 18 years of practice, admitted her misconduct, expressed remorse and showed she had taken steps to address her problems with alcohol. At the time of the stipulation, she had been drug- and alcohol-free for two years.

JESSANY EMILEIGH GARRETT [#241893], 59, of Newhall, was suspended for one year, stayed, placed on two years' probation and ordered to take the MPRE. The order took effect Sept. 13, 2013.

Garrett stipulated to the facts surrounding her August 2012 misdemeanor conviction for making criminal threats. Garrett was arrested after she pulled a gun on and threatened a man she discovered was in her driveway after hearing her car alarm triggered. The man did not immediately identify himself, but it turned out he worked for a repossession company and had come to seize her car.

In mitigation, Garrett admitted culpability and entered into a pre-trial stipulation.

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