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Suspensions/Probation
  1. JENS EDWARD HOEKENDIJK
  2. YEZNIK OHANNES KAZANDJIAN
  3. KENNETH JOHN KLEINBERG
  4. ELIZABETH ANN MELLO
  5. MICHELLE A. PERFILI
  6. ROBERT ROMAN
  7. VERNE CRAIG SCHOLL
  8. JOHN VARGAS
  9. LEON ARAKELIAN
  10. JACK CHIEN-LONG HUANG
  11. WILFORD THOMAS LEE
  12. WILLIAM BLACKFORD LOOK JR.
  13. LESLIE FERENC NADASI
  14. DAVID LAWRENCE RADLAUER

JENS EDWARD HOEKENDIJK [#161001], 50, of Burlingame, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on probation for one year and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Hoekendijk was suspended after he falsely reported to the State Bar that he completed his MCLE requirements when he had taken none of the required courses within the compliance period. Hoekendijk only completed the necessary courses after he was contacted by the State Bar in connection with an MCLE audit.

In mitigation, Hoekendijk had no prior record of discipline in 19 years of practicing law.

YEZNIK OHANNES KAZANDJIAN [#191917], 56, of Glendale, was suspended from the practice of law for 90 days and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on probation for two years and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Kazandjian was found culpable of two counts of misconduct in one client matter: failure to maintain client funds in his trust account and misappropriation. In 2011, Kazandjian allowed his client trust account to be overdrawn by $5,427.41. The overdraft occurred when Kazandjian wrote a client a check for $6,300 when the balance in his client trust account had fallen to $872.59.

In mitigation, Kazandjian had no prior record of discipline, repaid the amount owed to the client following the overdraft on the account and took corrective action to ensure he was keeping better tabs on his client trust account.  

KENNETH JOHN KLEINBERG [#110732], 63, of Irvine, was suspended from the practice of law for one year and until he pays restitution and was ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on probation for three years and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Kleinberg’s suspension resulted from his probation being revoked after he filed four quarterly reports to probation late. Kleinberg had been previously suspended for failing to pay income and employment taxes for a former employee for the 10-year period from 1994 through 2003. In order to be reinstated, Kleinberg must pay $80,380.83 plus interest in restitution to three governmental agencies.

Kleinberg was also suspended in 2013 for failing to comply with rule 9.20, committing an act of moral turpitude, holding himself out as entitled to practice law and engaging in the unauthorized practice of law, failing to obey the law, willfully disobeying a court order and failing to comply with the terms of his probation.

ELIZABETH ANN MELLO [#244401], 35, of Coyote, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. She was also placed on probation for one year and faces a one-year suspension if she does not comply with the terms of her probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Mello stipulated that she falsely told the State Bar she had met her MCLE requirements when she had only completed some of the necessary courses. Mello took the necessary courses to come into compliance after she was contacted in connection with an MCLE audit.

In mitigation, Mello had no prior discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

MICHELLE A. PERFILI [#107580], 57, of Lakeside, was suspended from the practice of law for six months and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. She was also placed on probation for two years and faces a two-year suspension if she does not comply with the terms of her probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Perfili committed misconduct in three matters including failing to participate and cooperate in a State Bar investigation, perform legal services with competence, promptly return client files and papers, refund unearned fees or respond to the reasonable status inquiries of a client. Perfili also did not comply with the terms of her disciplinary probation.

In one matter, Perfili failed to respond to two letters and two emails from a State Bar investigator in 2012 looking into a complaint made against her. In another matter that year, Perfili failed to perform all of the services she agreed to for a client or respond to his numerous requests for a status update on his case. She also took months to return his file after he fired her and refund the advanced fees he paid her after a State Bar complaint was filed against her.

Perfili did not comply with the terms of her 2012 discipline by failing to schedule a meeting with her probation deputy by deadline, submit three quarterly reports to probation on time or submit proof of attendance at a session of Ethics School.

Perfili had been disciplined once before for misconduct that occurred in two client matters in 2007. She engaged in the unauthorized practice of law by performing legal services during a period when she was not entitled to practice law for failing to pay State Bar membership dues. She also collected a fee for legal services while not entitled to practice and obtained a $2,000 loan from a client without providing a written agreement explaining the terms of the loan or advising the client of his or her right to seek independent counsel.

ROBERT ROMAN [#93369], 62, of Chino Hills, was suspended from the practice of law for two years and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was placed on probation for three years and faces a three-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Roman stipulated to three counts of misconduct in one client matter: misappropriation and failure to maintain client funds or cooperate with the State Bar. In determining Roman should be suspended, a State Bar Court judge wrote that disbarment would be unduly harsh.

“The court concludes that Respondent should be given another chance to prove to this court that he is willing and capable of discharging his duties as an attorney in a professional manner,” Judge Donald F. Miles wrote.

Roman’s misconduct stemmed from a personal injury matter he handled on behalf of a husband and wife. After the case was settled, Roman wrote to the couple’s medical providers suggesting that they reduce their medical liens. The couple’s doctor had not agreed to the arrangement, however, and Roman spent the remaining money that he should have been keeping for the doctor in his client trust account.

After the doctor filed a complaint with the State Bar, the two came to an agreement on a reduced amount, and Roman paid the doctor what he was owed. Roman also failed to respond to a letter from a State Bar investigator inquiring about the allegations made in the doctor’s complaint. In mitigation, Roman showed remorse and recognition of his wrongdoing, was experiencing emotional difficulties at the time of his misconduct and entered into a stipulation with the State Bar.

Roman had one prior record of discipline, a 2013 suspension for misconduct in two client matters, including improper withdrawal from employment and failing to perform services competently, communicate, return a client file or cooperate with the State Bar.

VERNE CRAIG SCHOLL [#48634], 72, of Carlsbad, was suspended from the practice of law for one year and ordered to take the MPRE, comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court and pay restitution. He was also placed on probation for two years and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Scholl stipulated to misconduct in 13 loan modification matters including collecting advanced fees for loan modification services, collecting illegal fees and holding himself out as eligible to practice law in states where he was not licensed. Scholl agreed to represent clients in Michigan, Virginia, Washington, Oregon, Florida, Indiana, Nevada and Arizona, despite being unlicensed in those states.

He was ordered to pay $32,444 plus interest in restitution. In mitigation, he presented evidence of his good character and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

Scholl has one prior record of discipline, a 2014 suspension for five acts of misconduct in two client matters. His offenses included misappropriating $49,000, failing to maintain funds in trust or promptly return client funds, practicing law in a state in which he was not licensed and collecting an illegal fee in a state where he was not authorized to practice law.

JOHN VARGAS [#270181], 45, of Riverside, was suspended from the practice of law for 60 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on probation for two years and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Vargas failed to properly handle three matters. In one matter, he was sanctioned twice for failing to appear in court. In another matter, he mishandled a bankruptcy case, and in the third matter, he abandoned a client.

In 2012, Vargas filed a case in Los Angeles County Superior Court, and not long afterwards, the court sent him a notice ordering him to appear at a hearing regarding his failure to file a proof of service of the summons and complaint. The court also sent him a notice of a case management conference. Vargas failed to appear at the hearing, leading the court to impose a $250 sanction. The court imposed another $350 sanction when Vargas did not show up for the case management conference. Vargas did not pay either sanction.

In another matter, Vargas was hired in 2012 to file a bankruptcy petition but failed to file the necessary documents, leading two petitions to be dismissed. Vargas’ client tried to contact him more than 50 times during the course of his representation but Vargas did not respond. Vargas also failed to respond to a letter from a State Bar investigator looking into the allegations in a complaint the client filed against him.

Vargas was also hired to assist a woman in resolving issues related to the distribution of her ex-husband’s pension. Although she paid him a $500 advanced fee, Vargas did no work on her behalf and did not refund the money. After the client filed a complaint against him, a State Bar investigator sent him a letter inquiring about the allegations. Vargas did not respond.

In mitigation, Vargas was suffering significant financial problems at the time of his misconduct that distracted him from his work. During trial, he also acknowledged his failures and showed sincere remorse for his misconduct.

LEON ARAKELIAN [#243180], 39, of Reseda, was placed on probation for one year and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect July 26, 2014.

Arakelian stipulated to misconduct in one client matter: failing to take steps to avoid reasonably foreseeable prejudice to a client or respond to client inquiries in a matter in which he’d agreed to provide legal services.

In September 2010, a woman hired Arakelian to represent her in a matter stemming from a three-car accident. For months, the woman’s daughter repeatedly called Arakelian to ask about the status of her mother’s case, but he did not respond. Arakelian eventually responded to an email and asked the daughter to send him documents related to the case, but then became unresponsive again for a year and a half.

Arakelian did not file a lawsuit or negotiate a settlement on behalf of the client against either of the other drivers prior to the expiration of the statute of limitations.

In mitigation, Arakelian entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar. He had one prior record of discipline, a 2014 suspension for misconduct in three client matters: committing moral turpitude and failing to perform with competence, refund unearned fees, account, comply with laws, communicate with a client or cooperate in State Bar investigation.

JACK CHIEN-LONG HUANG [#242193], 43, of Irvine, was suspended from the practice of law for two years and until he makes restitution. He was ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on probation for three years and faces a three-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect Aug. 8, 2014.

Writing that his case “illustrates ethical problems that arise when an attorney fails to supervise non-lawyers in a high volume practice,” a three-judge review panel found Huang culpable of misconduct in eight loan modification matters including charging upfront fees for loan modification work, failing to perform competently by not supervising his non-attorney staff and not providing clients with a statement informing them they did not need to hire a third party to negotiate a loan modification.

Admitted to the bar in 2006, Huang’s troubles began in 2009, when he met Robert Campoy and Andres Martinez, non-lawyers wanting legal advice about their loan modification business. A couple of months later, he agreed to go into business with them, taking over their loan modification files and hiring Campoy and Martinez and some of the employees from their former company.

Huang allowed non-lawyers to meet with clients, give advice, collect legal fees, prepare loan modification packages and negotiate with the lenders. In March 2011, he noticed irregularities and that employees were not following office procedures, including informing him of complaints. By September, he realized he had lost control of his office and closed it, firing all the employees and telling them to stop working on files. Campoy and Martinez and other employees ignored him and started working under a new firm name with a new lawyer.

Huang sent a cease-and-desist letter to Campoy and Martinez, took steps to shut down the website and notified the district attorney’s office and the State Bar. He made full restitution to most clients who were being charged through installment plans.

In mitigation, Huang had no prior record of discipline, proved his good character, displayed remorse and was cooperative.

WILFORD THOMAS LEE [#166168], 51, of Kearns, Utah, was suspended from the practice of law for six months and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on three years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with terms of his probation. The order took effect Aug. 8, 2014.

Lee stipulated to misconduct in three loan modification matters, including collecting an illegal fee, practicing law in a state where he was not licensed, knowingly making misrepresentations to the State Bar and committing acts of moral turpitude.

Lee practiced law in Illinois, North Carolina and Utah, states where he was unlicensed, and falsely claimed to the State Bar that he was affiliated with attorneys there.

In mitigation, Lee had no prior record of discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

WILLIAM BLACKFORD LOOK JR. [#66631], 65, of Monterey, was suspended from the practice of law for one year and ordered to take the MPRE and comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a two-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect Aug. 8, 2014.

In July 2012, a State Bar Court judge found Look culpable of violating two federal court orders. Look appealed to the Review Department claiming, among other things, that he was denied due process. The Review Department upheld the hearing judge’s findings and discipline recommendation.

In December 2009, a woman hired Look to pursue claims for injuries she suffered when three police officers allegedly used excessive force on her after a traffic stop. During the course of representing her, Look failed to comply with a discovery order requiring he meet multiple discovery deadlines and did not file a motion to withdraw after he told a judge he could not continue to represent the client for financial reasons.

Look had two prior records of discipline. In 1989, he was privately reproved following a misdemeanor conviction for disturbing the peace. In 2011, he was suspended for misconduct in one client matter: failing to maintain in trust more than $40,000 in disputed client funds, obtaining a pecuniary interest adverse to his client and failing to provide an accounting.

LESLIE FERENC NADASI [#81237], 66, of Lancaster, was suspended from the practice of law for one year and until he makes restitution and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect Aug. 8, 2014.

Nadasi was suspended after his probation was revoked. He failed to comply with three terms of his disciplinary probation. He did not file probation reports that were due on Oct. 10, 2013 and Jan. 10, 2014, did not provide proof of attending or passing Ethics school and did not return $4,500 in unearned fees he owed to two clients.

Nadasi was previously suspended in 2012 for nine counts of misconduct in four separate client matters including failing to return the clients’ files, refund unearned advanced fees, communicate, cooperate in a disciplinary investigation or perform legal services competently.

DAVID LAWRENCE RADLAUER [#180244], 51, of Placentia, was suspended from the practice of law for 30 days and ordered to take the MPRE. He was also placed on two years’ probation and faces a one-year suspension if he does not comply with the terms of his probation. The order took effect Aug. 9, 2014.

Radlauer stipulated to misconduct in one client matter: commingling funds in his client trust account and failing to promptly release a client’s file.

In 2012, Radlauer did not promptly remove funds he earned as fees from his client trust account. In September of that year he wrote a check from the account to a client even though there were no funds on deposit for him. Radlauer also wrote a check from the account to cover his personal expenses at a grocery store. In February 2013, the client to whom the check was written fired him, but Radlauer took months to turn his file over to the new attorney.

In mitigation, Radlauer had no prior discipline and entered into a pretrial stipulation with the State Bar.

. Caution!  More than 200,000 attorneys are eligible to practice law in California. Many attorneys share the same names. All discipline reports are taken from State Bar Court documents and should be read carefully for names, ages, addresses and bar numbers. Read the Discipline Key for an explanation of the different levels of disciplinary action. Use Attorney Search to check an attorney's official bar membership record.