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Disbarments
  1. TODD EUGENE MARSH
  2. JENNIFER J. MCGREADY-ORNELAS
  3. JOHN M. RIBARICH
  4. GEORGE E. WEBER
  5. RONALD DAVID GARBER
  6. FRANKLIN CASCO JR.
  7. JOHNNIE LEE TAYLOR

TODD EUGENE MARSH [#176065], 51, of Lake Hughes, was disbarred Sept. 3, 2016 and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Marsh was disbarred after his default was entered for failing to respond to a notice of disciplinary charges. Because he did not seek to have the default set aside or vacated within 90 days, he was disbarred and the charges against him deemed admitted.

In 2012, Marsh held himself out as entitled to practice law and actually practiced law while he was suspended. He also collected $750 in illegal fees.

In a second matter, he failed to file an opening brief or any pleading other than the notice of appeal in his client’s post-conviction criminal appeal matter, leading to the appeal being dismissed. He also failed to inform his client of significant developments or return unearned fees and told his client’s sister that her brother’s appeal was active when it wasn’t.

In addition, Marsh failed to update his membership address with the State Bar or comply with conditions of his disciplinary probation. He failed to contact the Office of Probation by deadline, meet with the Office of Probation, submit a quarterly report by its due date, begin mental health treatment, file a mental health report or submit six other quarterly probation reports on time.

Marsh had two prior records of discipline. In 2011, he was suspended after stipulating to 13 counts of misconduct in four matters. He committed moral turpitude by writing checks with insufficient funds in his client trust account and mishandling client funds. He also commingled funds, concealed from his client the fact that he had not filed a lawsuit, and failed to maintain client funds in trust, communicate with clients, timely disburse client funds, perform legal services with competence or release a client file and client fees. He was suspended again in 2015 for violating rule 9.20.

JENNIFER J. MCGREADY-ORNELAS [#262482], 43, of Newport Beach, was disbarred Sept. 3, 2016 and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

McGready-Ornelas failed to respond to a notice of disciplinary charges and her default was entered. Because she did not seek to have the default set aside or vacated as required under rule 5.85 of the State Bar’s Rules of Procedure, she was disbarred and the charges against her deemed admitted.

The charges involved one client matter. She failed to perform with competence by not showing up at meeting with a client to review paperwork in the client’s bankruptcy proceeding, and failing to file that paperwork or perform any legal services on the client’s behalf. In addition, she failed to promptly return unearned fees, respond to reasonable status inquiries, update her membership address or cooperate with a disciplinary investigation.

JOHN M. RIBARICH [#183883], 52, of Los Angeles, was disbarred Sept. 3, 2016 and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court and make restitution.

Ribarich failed to appear at a State Bar Court trial after he was charged with 23 counts of misconduct stemming from five consolidated matters, leading to his default being entered. Because he did not seek to have the default set aside or vacated within 45 days as required under rule 5.85 of the State Bar’s Rules of Procedure, he was disbarred and the charges against him deemed admitted.

Ribarich was found culpable of collecting advanced fees prior to completing all services in a loan modification matter (16 counts), failing to account (three counts), making statements in writing to the State Bar he knew were false, misappropriation, failing to maintain client funds in trust and writing a check against insufficient funds.

He was ordered to pay $2,865 plus interest in restitution.

He was disciplined on two prior occasions. In 2011, he was privately reproved for improperly contracting with four separate clients to limit his professional malpractice liability and entering into agreements with three of those clients to withdraw their disciplinary complaints. In 2013, he was suspended for failing to promptly release a client’s file, improperly collecting advanced fees for mortgage loan modification services and entering into an agreement with a client to withdraw a disciplinary complaint.

GEORGE E. WEBER [#220592], 43, of Newport Beach, was disbarred Sept. 3, 2016 and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

Weber failed to respond to a notice of disciplinary charges and his default was entered. Because he made no attempt to have the default set aside or vacated within 90 days as required under rule 5.85 of the State Bar’s Rules of Procedure, he was disbarred.

The charges were deemed admitted. Weber failed to comply with a court order by not paying $4,037.50 in sanctions, did not report the sanctions to the State Bar and failed to cooperate in a State Bar investigation by not responding to an investigator’s letters.

RONALD DAVID GARBER [#100760], 63, of Santa Monica, was summarily disbarred Sept. 3, 2016 and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

On Sept. 12, 2011, Garber pleaded guilty to two counts of subscribing a false tax return.

FRANKLIN CASCO JR. [#235815], 55, of Tustin, was summarily disbarred Sept. 11, 2016 and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

On May 15, 2013, he pleaded guilty to identity theft and false personation among other crimes.

JOHNNIE LEE TAYLOR [#117532], 64, of Pasadena, was disbarred Sept. 16, 2016 and ordered to comply with rule 9.20 of the California Rules of Court.

A State Bar Court hearing judge initially recommended Taylor be suspended, finding him culpable of 13 probation violations but noting that there were mitigating factors. The Office of Chief Trial Counsel appealed, asking he be disbarred. A three-judge review panel, while adopting the judge’s culpability findings, found more aggravating factors and fewer in mitigation.

Taylor failed to submit four quarterly probation reports and violated his Lawyer Assistance Program plan by missing drug tests and group therapy sessions without being excused. In total, he missed seven scheduled lab tests and twice failed to attend group therapy sessions.

Taylor’s four prior disciplines included a 1993 public reproval for two counts of failing to perform competently and one of failing to communicate significant developments. He was publicly reproved again in 2002 for failing to obey a court order imposing sanctions or report the sanctions to the State Bar on time. His third disciplinary proceeding, which resulted in a suspension, stemmed from his conviction for two felony counts of stalking and misdemeanor driving under the influence. In 2011, he was suspended for failing to competently perform legal services, resulting in client harm, and failing to maintain the respect due the courts and judicial officers.

. Caution!  More than 200,000 attorneys are eligible to practice law in California. Many attorneys share the same names. All discipline reports are taken from State Bar Court documents and should be read carefully for names, ages, addresses and bar numbers. Read the Discipline Key for an explanation of common disciplinary terms. Use Attorney Search to check an attorney's official bar record.